Browsing All Posts filed under »Broadband«

Broadband: How do we rate?

March 8, 2012

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In my telecom policy class this morning, I discussed the FCC’s National Broadband Plan with my students. When I explained the impetus behind the plan was a general feeling that the U.S. was falling behind the rest of the world in broadband deployment, most of the students reacted with skepticism. I agree that the “America […]

The 30 Percent: Is a Little Competition Enough?

February 20, 2012

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In the last two posts, I showed how 60 percent of the country will have a choice between two providers of broadband speeds more than enough to stream HD video. What about the other 40 percent? First, up to 10 percent of the country will not have access to high speed broadband from anyone. The […]

Broadband Competition: Same As It Ever Was

February 9, 2012

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Yesterday, I talked about the 60 percent of Americans who have a choice between two broadband providers with the capacity to handle any services they might use. The picture isn’t as rosy for the other 40 percent. Most of them (30 percent of U.S. households) will also have access to broadband at speeds that can […]

Cable Broadband Monopoly? Not for Most Americans.

February 8, 2012

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For my first post as a new member of the faculty of the University of Colorado, it seems appropriate to discuss the state of the U.S. broadband market before this weekend’s Silicon Flatirons annual broadband conference. The broadband state of the Union has improved dramatically. Most Americans now have access to broadband speeds that were […]